Senior Speeches: Raven Dziedzinski ’19

May 08, 2019


But ten years later I’m glad that I have Reece and Reed because I have had so many funny experiences with them and learned so much from them. I have also learned so much from watching my parents raise two boys along with me.

Each year, seniors and postgraduates at Shattuck-St. Mary’s School deliver a speech to their peers on a topic of their choosing in the Newhall Auditorium. Often equal parts clever and moving, emotional and personal, each speech offers a glimpse into the lives, experiences, struggles, and triumphs of SSM seniors.

Throughout the 2018-19 school year, we will share these speeches with the SSM community and hope that you enjoy the humor, wisdom, and powerful reflections conveyed by our senior students.  

June 27, 2008. I remember rushing to the hospital after a long day at summer camp and being so excited. My mom had given birth that day, and I couldn’t wait to meet my new siblings. Yes, siblings as in two; she had twins. My parents didn’t want to know their genders until they were born, so I was very anxious to find out if I was going to have sisters or brothers, or maybe one of each. I really wanted a sister and, since there were two, I thought the odds were in my favor.

But, boy, was I wrong. I arrived at the hospital to find two boys named Reece and Reed. At the time, I was sad I didn’t get a sister. But ten years later I’m glad that I have Reece and Reed because I have had so many funny experiences with them and learned so much from them. I have also learned so much from watching my parents raise two boys along with me.

For example, my dad taught me what to do if I ever lose a three-year-old on a college campus in the middle of Chicago. We were at the University of Illinois at Chicago where I had swimming practice. My dad was playing with Reed on the bleachers of the softball field while Reece went to the batting cages to play with some other kids. My dad made sure to glance at the batting cage every now and then to make sure Reece was still in there, but one of the times my dad looked over, he noticed that Reece wasn’t in there anymore. Turns out there was another doorway at the other end of the cage.

My dad immediately got all of his stuff together. Then he tried to pick Reed up so he could go find out what happened to Reece. However, Reed began kicking and screaming because he didn’t want to leave the bleachers. After my dad finally got Reed up, he began walking all around the campus asking a bunch a people if they had seen a little boy running around. No one had seen him, but a group of people helped my dad look for him. After probably thirty minutes of looking, my dad saw a lady holding a little boy’s hand. He walked closer and saw that it was Reece. The lady said that she’d seen him walking around and decided to grab his hand before he went too far. My dad was very thankful and so relieved. When my dad asked Reece why he ran off, he replied that he was trying to catch a rabbit that had run by.

Thank you mom for teaching me that without you everything really does fall apart. Even though we have our differences and there have been many arguments, this family wouldn’t be what it is without you.

Thank you Reece for being the outgoing and curious kid that you are. I admire your ability to be able to go up to almost anyone and being able to talk to them like you have known them for years.

Thank you Reed for always being at the door to greet me when I come home for break with that warm “welcome home guest” to make sure that I know that I am only a guest in the house now.

Looking back on it I am glad that I have gotten to spend the majority of my life with Reece and Reed. I am forever grateful for all of the lessons you have taught me. Each time I come home I am amazed with how much you guys have grown. I hope you guys don’t grow up too fast and I’m very excited to come home for summer to spend time with you guys.

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